Why a Glass Coffee Pot is the Best Way to Brew Coffee

Published: 23rd January 2012
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A good tempered glass coffee pot is absolutely the best thing to have on hand to produce a great tasting cup of coffee. Whether you have an automatic drip coffee maker, a percolator, or make “cowboy coffee” on your stovetop, you will want to have a good, glass coffee pot for the purest and most reliable flavor. There are a number of reasons why a glass coffee pot is best for brewing coffee. Cowboy coffee mentioned here is made by measuring a rounded tablespoon of coffee per cup directly into the pot, adding fresh water, and placing it on the stovetop on medium-high heat. Keep a close eye on it until it is dark enough to suit you, then turn the heat off and let it sit for about 5 minutes before pouring. All the grounds will sink to the bottom, but you will probably want to use a strainer or better yet, a paper filter when you pour!

First of all, with a glass coffee maker, you can see the coffee’s progress. This is especially important if you are percolating your coffee or if you are making “cowboy coffee”. You need to be able to see how dark your coffee is getting and turn off the heat when it’s just right for you!

Glass coffee pots come clean! Even if you have an automatic coffee maker or old-fashioned manual drip coffee setup, you should have a glass coffee pot. Glass just provides better tasting coffee because you can get it sparkling clean, so no old, acidic coffee residue remains. You won’t have any doubts as to the cleanliness of your glass coffee pot because you can see right through it!

To make sure you have a clean a glass coffee pot just scrub the pot with a little baking soda and warm water and then rinse with white vinegar followed by very warm or hot water. Alternately, you can scrub with salt and half a lemon. Just squeeze the juice of the lemon into your coffee pot and use the lemon half to scrub, then rinse thoroughly with warm or hot water. Both of these methods cuts through coffee stains on the glass and removes any acidic residue.

If you need to clean your coffee maker with a glass pot or a glass percolator, you can clean the outside first. Then, fill the reservoir with water and add about half a cup of white vinegar. Run it through its cycle or let it perk for five minutes or so. Empty it and repeat with clean water. This process will freshen every part of your coffee maker or percolator. This also works with an insulated glass-lined carafe. You may not get to see the difference as well, but you will definitely notice the difference with your next cup of coffee!

Glass coffee pots protect the flavor of your coffee! One concern with metal coffee pots, especially those made with aluminum, is that they not only infuse your coffee with an unpleasant metallic taste, they also add potentially harmful metal residues to your coffee. Residual aluminum from cooking pans and coffee pots can build up in your system and cause health problems. In fact, aluminum deposits in the brain may be one of the causes of Alzheimer’s disease.

Glass coffee pots are easy to find! You can purchase new glass coffee carafes to fit any modern coffee maker. Just check online or in almost any department or discount store. There are also a few very lovely vintage glass coffee percolators still floating around. As with all vintage items, you just have to search diligently in thrift shops, estate sales and online auctions until you find what you are looking for. No matter what type of glass coffee pot you purchase, you are sure to notice the fresh, clean flavor it gives your first morning cup.

Also called “Texas Boiled Coffee”, cowboy coffee is very easy to make. You just measure rounded tablespoon of coffee per cup directly into the pot, add fresh water, and place it on the stovetop on medium-high heat. Keep a close eye on it! When it starts to simmer, watch it until it is dark enough to suit you, then turn it off and let it sit for about 5 minutes before pouring. All the grounds will sink to the bottom, but you will probably want to use a strainer when you pour!


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